Dogs and cats at discounted rates

Campbelltown Animal Care Facility's companion animal re-homing officer Merryn Benham with two-year-old staffy, Arnold. Picture: Simon Bennett

Campbelltown Animal Care Facility's companion animal re-homing officer Merryn Benham with two-year-old staffy, Arnold. Picture: Simon Bennett

Pet lovers will be able to purchase certain dogs and cats from Campbelltown Animal Care Facility for half the price from July 1.

Councillors recently voted in favour of the concept which would be used at the discretion of animal control coordinators.

The policy aims to encourage residents to adopt dogs and cats that have proved difficult to be re-homed and are at risk of being euthanised.

On average, dogs at the facility cost $384 while cats cost $235. The fee includes desexing, registration and microchipping.

That means owners have the potential to save about $190 and $120 per dog and cat, respectively.

In the 2015-2016 calendar year, 79 dogs and 164 that were considered appropriate to be re-homed were euthanised as an owner could not be found.

Campbelltown councillor Ted Rowell (Liberal) has been a strong advocate of the facility since he was elected to council.

Cr Rowell said he would have preferred the initiative be trialled in February – when the care facility is inundated with dogs and cats that were unwanted Christmas presents – and the animals given away for free.

Though he said the discretionary 50 per cent discount was a “good start”.

“It gives dogs and cats a fighting chance to be re-homed,” he said.

Cr Rowell said there was a possibility people could take advantage of the system if the animals were given away for free, though he didn’t believe people would be likely to rort the system.

“There’s always that possibility, you can’t rule it out. But 99 per cent of people would have the animals’ welfare at heart,” he said.

A report prepared by Campbelltown Council staff said Blacktown Council also offered a similar scheme.

However, the Blacktown scheme was generally applied in cases on financial hardship and the prospective owner was still required to pay the cost of registration.

Cr Rowell said Campbelltown’s initiative was focused on the welfare of the dogs and cats: “It’s not aimed at pensioners or low income families – it’s about the animals’ welfare.”

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