Primary students were the first to code experiments for International Space Station

Zeek Finey, Callan Phillips and Tyler Hodgson were among the first public school students to code a science experiment that was sent on a rocket into space. Picture: Chris Lane
Zeek Finey, Callan Phillips and Tyler Hodgson were among the first public school students to code a science experiment that was sent on a rocket into space. Picture: Chris Lane

Four Elderslie Public School students were among the first in the country to code science experiments destined to be conducted by astronauts on International Space Station.

A rocket carrying the experiments was launched last week.

Astronauts will send the data back to the students.

Kids from six public schools chose an experiment and coded the hardware necessary to complete it in space.

Zeek Finey, 12, Callan Phillips, 11, Luke Cordeschi, 10, and Tyler Hodgson, 10, coded an experiment to test the temperature in space.

The experiment was then put onto a disc that was sent to Florida. The experiment and barometers were then loaded onto the shuttle. 

Relieving principal Melissa Clarke said she was proud of the boys who had “made history”.

“They are the first public primary students to have an experiment launched into space,” she said.

The project was run by Cuberider and was previously only offered to high school students.

The primary school students went to Casula High School once a week for 10 weeks to work on the project.

Zeek Finey, Callan Phillips and Tyler Hodgson were among the first public school students to code a science experiment that was sent on a rocket into space. Picture: Chris Lane

Zeek Finey, Callan Phillips and Tyler Hodgson were among the first public school students to code a science experiment that was sent on a rocket into space. Picture: Chris Lane

Callan said the coolest part of the project for him was the fact code he worked on was sent up to space, and Luke said he enjoyed watching the recording of the rocket launch. Tyler said his favourite part of the project was meeting and working with other students.

Zeek said the experiment sparked his interest in coding and he was proud that he could now use those skills.

“In the future it will be important to know how to code,” he said. “We will rely even more on technology and those skills will help me get a job.”

Ms Clarke agreed the students had learnt vital skills that would help them find employment later in life.

“Data and statistics show that 80 to 90 per cent of jobs in the future will require an element of coding,” she said. “It is important that students are exposed to coding early and that they learn those skills. This project was a great opportunity and the students were challenged to work with 21st century technology.”