Boarding houses get the green light

An artist impression of 1 Bocking Avenue, Bradbury contained in the Campbelltown Council business papers.
An artist impression of 1 Bocking Avenue, Bradbury contained in the Campbelltown Council business papers.

Campbelltown Council is determined to ensure streets don’t become over-run with boarding houses.

Applications for two more boarding houses were approved at last night’s council meeting. One of the applications – 1 Bocking Avenue, Bradbury – is located about 90 metres from an existing boarding house at 3 Bradbury, Avenue.

While not opposed to affordable housing, Cr Warren Morrison (independent) said he held fears for the nearby residents and the existing character of the streets should too many of the complexes be built in close proximity.

“We do need cheaper accommodation for people but some of these streets are small, and I feel more (boarding houses) being built will affect residents in the street,” he said.

Council staff, at Cr Morrison’s request, will investigate ways to limit the number of boarding houses in the one area.

Campbelltown has become a hotspot for boarding house applications in recent years.

The proposals have often sparked lively debate in the council chambers and in 2015 the council was so inundated with applications they – unsuccessfully – asked the state government for a halt to be placed on boarding houses in Campbelltown.

Several councillors were particularly concerned with the lack of parking spaces allocated in the proposals before the chamber.

Under state government legislation certain boarding houses only have to provide one car space for every five rooms.

There were only two off-street parking spots provided at 1 Bocking Avenue and four spots at the other proposal – 60 Moore Street, Campbelltown complex.

Cr Meg Oates (Labor) said it was “unrealistic” to think the lack of parking spots would cause issues.

“I have real problems about parking,” she said.

“People that live on the corner of Bocking Avenue are always experiencing problems with cars parked all the way up the street on both sides.

“It’s unrealistic to think that it won’t create a problem.”

An artist impression of 60 Moore Street, Campbelltown contained in the Campbelltown Council business papers.

An artist impression of 60 Moore Street, Campbelltown contained in the Campbelltown Council business papers.

Cr Oates also said residents near the 60 Moore Street complex would be affected by an increase in parked cars – either owned by residents in the complex or their visitors.

“The impact will hit Reddall Street – it will cop it big time,” she said.

“It’s not fair that [existing residents’] lifestyle and amenity will be changed.

“I won’t be supporting this.”

Cr Ralph George (Liberal) said he’d like to see more parking spaces provided – even though the number was acceptable under regulations.

“Do we want to live in a ‘bare minimum Campbelltown’?,” he said.

Cr Ben Moroney said he’d vote in favour of both developments but only because the council’s hands were tied by state government government legislation.

“This is compliant with the SEPP (State Environmental Planning Policy). If council were to reject it, it could be challenged in the Land and Environment Court and it’s a case we would likely not win,” he said.