High-rise apartments on the agenda for Leumeah but there's no mention of a hotel of entertainment precinct

The future: An artist impression of what the precinct around Leumeah Train Station could look like in 20 years. Picture: Department of Planning and Environment
The future: An artist impression of what the precinct around Leumeah Train Station could look like in 20 years. Picture: Department of Planning and Environment

Plans for a hotel and a large entertainment precinct in Leumeah are no closer.

Wests Leagues Club chief executive Tony Mathew previously told the Advertiser the Leumeah club had a desire to build a hotel on top of its existing structure, develop the site of the tennis club and create an entertainment precinct.

Mr Mathew had been eagerly awaiting the pre-Christmas release of the state government’s Glenfield to Macarthur Urban Renewal Corridor Strategy – which outlined a 20-year plan for development around Campbelltown’s seven railway stations – so the club could push ahead with its plans.

While the strategy showed areas south of Old Leumeah Road were set to change dramatically, plans for the club’s land to the north remained the same. With the land designated “cultural and leisure” rather than high-rise or mixed use, the club was no clearer on whether its vision would, or could, come to fruition.

“It (the precinct) is moving in the right direction but it didn’t go as far as I would have liked it to,” he said. “If the area is cultural and leisure and it’s not commercially viable, nothing will happen there.

“But now we need to look at trying to be involved in the master planning for the area.”

Plans for the precinct show high-rise buildings located on the south-eastern side of the railway line, with a large cluster of three six-storey buildings further to the east. About 900 new dwellings would be built in the next 20 years.

High-rise living in the precinct is not a new concept. The Mosaic building opposite the club, constructed in 2008, caused controversy after new home buyers snapped up apartments only to learn a large portion had been designated for social housing.

Mr Mathew believed more high-rise development in the area would be a positive and the club’s potential entertainment precinct would complement the influx of residents. “An entertainment precinct with coffee shops, restaurants, bars gymnasiums and a theatre would need a mass of people living in the area to cater for the site,” he said.

However there was one obvious concern with the strategy – parking. An artist impression showed parking outside the Leumeah Shopping Centre would be cleared to make way for the high rises, while land currently home to commuter parking on the south-western side of the railway line was designated for mixed use retail and residential buildings.

The strategy only mentioned a parking study be undertaken to “identify demand” and “develop appropriate parking management strategies”.

See page 15 for columnist Jeff McGill’s take on the plans for Leumeah.