Greyhound Rescue delighted by new volunteers

The Greyhound Rescue team wants to give the Macarthur community a big pat on the back.

The charity organisation made a call for volunteers when it moved to Camden in January and local residents responded enthusiastically.

Greyhound Rescue secretary Sue Bradshaw said after the Advertiser’s article last month more than 60 people called to volunteer.

“It was a phenomenal response,” she said.

“Right now we have about 30 new kennel volunteers who are active and doing shifts.

“We're incredibly grateful – it means so much to the quality of life experienced by the dogs.”

Ms Bradshaw said the Macarthur community had been incredibly welcoming.

“We are still getting about five volunteer inquires a week,” she said.

The new Camden facility will also allow the organisation to house more Greyhounds in need.

“As far as kennels go, the quality of our new kennels are far superior to the old ones,” Ms Bradshaw said.

“Our volunteers love coming out here.”

Ms Bradshaw said the current volunteers came from all walks of life.

“We have a diverse mix of people. We have older people who were looking for something to do and younger people who are passionate about dogs,” she said.

“We also have a disabled girl who comes and reads to the dogs – so that just goes to show you shouldn’t let a disability stop you from becoming a volunteer.”

Volunteer roster coordinator Lauren Jumikis said more volunteers were still needed.

She said there were four weekday shifts which each need another two or three committed, long term volunteers.

“These shifts are Tuesday PM, Wednesday AM and PM, as well as Thursday PM. They are the hardest for us to fill. Saturday PM could do with an extra helper too,” she said.

“Morning shifts are 8am-11am, while afternoon shifts are 3pm-6pm. Kennel volunteers walk dogs, play with dogs, clean, feed and groom the hounds.”

Lauren said interested people can email her at  volunteer@greyhoundrescue.com.au.

“We’ll respond with an application form that helps us get to know new volunteers a bit better. It’s also useful to know why they’re interested and hear about any prior experience,” she said.

Sue said there were many ways people could get involved beyond kennel volunteering, like adoption, fostering and sponsoring.

Foster carers are needed to introduce dogs to life as part of a household. Fostering allows people to ‘try before they buy’.

“We pay the full cost of necessary vet bills while a dog is in foster, while carers cover food, shelter and flea treatments. We’ll supply muzzle, coat, collar and lead,” Ms Bradshaw said.

“How long a hound stays with carers depends on the number of adoption applications we get, but foster carers should be prepared to accommodate a dog for at least six months.”

Carers are also required to meet and greet potential adopters when the time comes.

“They can always adopt, but carers tell us it’s great to see a foster dog go to its forever home,” Ms Bradshaw said.

“Anyone who’s interested should complete a fostering form via our website.

“Our greyhounds are de-sexed, vaccinated and heartworm tested. Adopters pay $350 per dog.”

Greyhound Rescue relies on donations and gets no assistance from government so another great way to help is to make a donation.