Anzac Day: Remembering those who fell

RESPECT: Marchers can wear their own or a relative's medals. Your own medals should be worn on the left hand side of your chest, over your heart.
RESPECT: Marchers can wear their own or a relative's medals. Your own medals should be worn on the left hand side of your chest, over your heart.

ADVERTISING FEATURE

As the sun rises on April 25, thousands of Australians will attend a solemn ceremony.

The Anzac Day dawn service is usually held at a town cenotaph, or at a memorial park, or in Canberra at the Australian War Memorial.

Later in the day, people will join the Anzac Day march and parade.

This advertising feature is sponsored by:

A commemoration service may also be held, where a wreath may be laid at a cenotaph or monument marking soldiers who fell.

In the afternoon, people may indulge in a game of two-up at their local pub or club.

Anzac Day marks the first landing of Diggers from the Australian Imperial Force at Gaba Tepe, now known as Anzac Cove, on April 25, 1915.

Twenty thousand Australian soldiers landed just before dawn on the Gallipoli peninsula.

The Gallipoli campaign claimed the lives of 8000 Australian soldiers; Anzac Days remember their courage and provide a nation with an opportunity to reflect on our first major military action during World War I.

Lest we forget.