REAL AUSTRALIA

Six of the best: Why we need to dig in for the long haul

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When the going gets tough: what's the answer? One approach is the head-down, dig-in method. Or is it burying your head in the sand? Photo: Shutterstock

When the going gets tough: what's the answer? One approach is the head-down, dig-in method. Or is it burying your head in the sand? Photo: Shutterstock

Fires are still front of mind across much of Australia, for obvious reasons. We've included some fire-related articles in our six super from across the ACM network this week. The first one is required reading. They are even more prescient given the government's overnight announcement of financial "relief" for volunteer firefighters - which you'll find explained further down the newsletter.

A Bawley Point resident watches from his rooftop as firefighting aircraft battle a bushfire on the NSW south coast. Picture: Sitthixay Ditthavong

A Bawley Point resident watches from his rooftop as firefighting aircraft battle a bushfire on the NSW south coast. Picture: Sitthixay Ditthavong

THE CANBERRA TIMES: Fears longer bushfire season will make resources scarce and expensive

As Australia continues to burn, the discussion continues - endlessly. What about fuel management, could we have taken a different approach? How does the allocation of large firefighting aircraft work - is even a system? Wouldn't bigger aircraft capable of carrying bigger loads be more efficient?

Reporter Steve Evans has addressed these questions and more. READ ON

Barry and Bernadette Wurlod at the grounds of their winery in Dixie. Photo: Morgan Hancock

Barry and Bernadette Wurlod at the grounds of their winery in Dixie. Photo: Morgan Hancock

WARRNAMBOOL STANDARD: When milk turns to wine, metaphorically speaking

A generation ago, a farmer's son would take over the farm from their father, no questions asked. That was the case for Dixie dairy farmer Barry Wurlod, who took on his father's dairy farm when he finished school.

Faced with a generational shift, unstable milk prices and 200-hectares of productive land to run, the Wurlods decided that when life gives you lemons, make lemonade. Or more fittingly, when life gives you grapes, make wine, writes Kyra Gillespie. READ ON

At the end of 2017/18, there were 14,034 oil and gas wells in Queensland. Photo: GasFields Commission

At the end of 2017/18, there were 14,034 oil and gas wells in Queensland. Photo: GasFields Commission

QUEENSLAND COUNTRY LIFE:  Sparks as CSG takes off

As the clock winds down on another decade, QCL editor Melody Labinsky has commissioned a series of articles on the big issues of the past 10 years. No surprise CSG features.

It was the issue that pitted two of Queensland's biggest economic drivers against each other.Agriculture, touted as a pillar of the state during the 2011 election campaign, and the resource industry's next big thing, coal seam gas. Could the two coexist? READ ON

Balmoral residents during the destructive bushfires. Photo: Deb Padroth

Balmoral residents during the destructive bushfires. Photo: Deb Padroth

ILLAWARRA MERCURY: 'We're still standing' insists one fire-hit village

The captain of Balmoral Fire Station saw first-hand what happened when fire tore through the NSW Southern Highlands village just before Christmas.

Now he's hoping to lift the spirits of hundreds of heartbroken residents with a street party on Monday. But he needs our help. Let Tareyn Varley explain further. READ ON

Peter Russell-Clarke.

Peter Russell-Clarke.

WIMMERA MAIL-TIMES: The bearded bloke with a passion for art and food

Long before our screens were filled with celebrity chefs and tearful contestants fretting over bombe-alaska and croquembouche, there was a friendly, bearded Aussie bloke known as Peter, G'day, Russell, G'day, Clarke.

Now 84, and living in country Victoria his personality hasn't dimmed. His conversation is still peppered with out of the blue comments and the odd unprintable word or two. Kathy Sharpe had the pleasure of his company. READ ON

Ray Kelly (arms folded) training aspiring boxers on The Contender. Photo: supplied

Ray Kelly (arms folded) training aspiring boxers on The Contender. Photo: supplied

NORTHERN DAILY LEADER: From dropout to doctorate, Ray Kelly is taking down diabetes

Asking Ray Kelly about diabetes might be similar to stepping into a boxing ring with him. Before you've register the bell has rung, he's hit you with facts and figures about the disease.

All of sudden you're on the ropes wondering how we got in to this situation in the first place. After the initial flurry, Jacob McArthur dusted himself off and dug a bit deeper. READ ON

Enjoy your Sunday.

In other news across Australia ...‚Äč

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