Warradale Men's Shed seeks more members

Warradale Men's Shed is seeking more members to join their group. Picture: Chris Lane
Warradale Men's Shed is seeking more members to join their group. Picture: Chris Lane

Mateship, good conversation and a little bit of handiwork - there's plenty to like about Warradale Men's Shed.

The organisation is looking to boost its numbers and welcome more men to the fold.

Secretary Les Rhodes said he'd gained a lot from joining the club, which is located in Warragamba.

"For me, it's been a great thing," he said.

"You get to meet a lot of new blokes and make great friends. Everyone's got a story to tell.

"Shortly after I joined I found out I had prostate cancer. I just happened to mention it one day and one of the other fellas here said that he'd had it, and he went through all that he'd done with his cancer.

"To me, that helped so much, I had someone else to talk to about it.

"That's what's great about the Men's Shed, everyone's had some sort of experience, and can relate."

Men's shed members crafted nesting boxes for native wildlife, which Geraldine Cox (right) will use for her regeneration project. Picture: Chris Lane

Men's shed members crafted nesting boxes for native wildlife, which Geraldine Cox (right) will use for her regeneration project. Picture: Chris Lane

One of the Men's Shed's most recent projects involved crafting wooden 'nesting boxes' for native animals.

Buxton resident Geraldine Cox uses the boxes to give critters like sugar gliders, birds and other animals a space to safely rest and breed in the bush on and near her property.

"The nesting boxes are for fauna of all kinds," Ms Cox said.

"They'd normally nest in tree hollows but we've lost so many trees in the fires.

"The Warradale guys have done such a great job, there's a great camaraderie there. I feel like I've found another family with them."

Mr Rhodes said the Men's Shed was involved in plenty of other community projects.

"We've done lots of little things around the community, from older people that need rails on their patio repaired, to making equipment for schools," he said.

"We made a ramp for one bloke who needed a wheelchair. There's much more like that.

"They might seem small, but to the people you're doing it for, it means a lot."

Mr Rhodes said people didn't need to have any handyman skills to join the Men's Shed.

"You don't have to do anything if you don't want to," the 73-year-old said.

"Some chaps just sit down out the back in the meal room and have a chat. It's a lovely sunny spot.

"Sometimes they might tinker in the garden.

"There's something for everyone."

Warradale Men's Shed currently has about 30 members, and Mr Rhodes said they're hoping to grow to about 50.

He said joining up was "one of the best things I've ever done".

"It gets your mind working again, after you retire," the Wallacia resident said.

"If you stay at home all the time, your brain doesn't work as well in my opinion.

"Here, you can keep your brain active.

"There's great comradeship in the Men's Shed. People help each other no matter what."

Mr Rhodes said the Men's Shed was open to any men aged 18 or above, no matter where they live.

Warradale Men's Shed meets at their workshop (opposite Warragamba Worker's Club) at 10 Eighteenth Street, Warragamba between 9am and 2pm on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays.

Pop in or email warradalemensshed4@gmail.com to find out more.