Macarthur boxer set to compete for prestigious world title

Adam Sapienza taking part in the annual Corporate Clash Macarthur.
Adam Sapienza taking part in the annual Corporate Clash Macarthur.

The Covid-19 pandemic hasn't slowed down Adam Sapienza's fighting spirit.

The Rossmore boxer has spent the past year training for the World Boxing Foundation's (WBF) heavyweight title.

Sapienza already holds the Australian heavyweight title and hopes to win the prestigious world title on November 7 in Queensland.

"I'll be fighting Jack Booth - he's an NZ-born heavyweight fighter and he is a bit more experienced than me," he said.

"I'm not nervous. I'm going up there to win.

"I don't want anything less and I won't be happy with anything less than a win."

The homegrown champion also holds state titles and the King of the Ring title.

Sapienza is training eight times a week for the fight, both mornings and nights.

He said it was a welcome surprise to be nominated for the world title bout.

"I was ecstatic because it wasn't something I was really expecting," Sapienza said.

"It's something you might work toward your whole life and never achieve so it's really good to be going up there."

He said he wasn't worried about sticking to Queensland strict Covid-19 restrictions prior to his fight.

"Even if we have to go up and quarantine for two weeks, that is what we will do," Sapienza said.

"We have it all sorted out with the people we would be staying with up there so I can continue to train."

Grange High Performance coach Anthony Redward (left), masters champion boxers Adam Sapienza, Peter Meades, John MacDonald and Jason Shaw, US fighter Jeanelle Freiman Orsi and coach Paul Druce. Picture: Anthony Redward

Grange High Performance coach Anthony Redward (left), masters champion boxers Adam Sapienza, Peter Meades, John MacDonald and Jason Shaw, US fighter Jeanelle Freiman Orsi and coach Paul Druce. Picture: Anthony Redward

Boxing runs in the blood for the Sapienza family, with the mature boxer's young son Blake also an Australian champion.

"My son is an Australian champ as well so I keep telling him that I'll be one up on him when I win this title," Sapienza said.

"So I really have to win because I need the bragging rights at home."

The avid boxer thanked renowned Smeaton Grange boxing coach Anthony Redward for giving him his start in the ring.

"I started off at Grange High Performance so I really have to give full credit to Anthony Redward," Sapienza said.

"He helped to get me this far."

Sapienza recommended boxing as a sport for people of any age.

"It's a really good sport not just physically but mentally," he said.

"You train with your coaches and you have a team behind you but once you get into that ring you're own your own.

"It makes you a little vulnerable and the only person you can rely on is yourself."