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Informer: The race is far from over

An artist's impression showcasing how the Australian-made rover could contribute to a bigger international exploration program on the moon. Picture: Australian Space Agency
An artist's impression showcasing how the Australian-made rover could contribute to a bigger international exploration program on the moon. Picture: Australian Space Agency

Prime Minister Scott Morrison once famously uttered the words: "it's not a race" about the push to get vaccinated against COVID-19.

But it seems there is one race he's more than happy to be a part of.

The space race.

The federal government will fork out $50 million to get an Australian-made rover to the moon.

The interstellar mission is part of a wider plan to eventually establish some sort of civilisation on the moon.

The PM also stated that he wanted to triple the size of the space sector over the next decade.

One man who most likely isn't feeling over-the-moon today is mining magnate and former United Australia Party leader, Clive Palmer.

Palmer lost his High Court battle with Western Australia over legislation that impacted his iron ore project in the state, which he claimed was unconstitutional. However, the court ruled today that the law was valid.

WA Premier Mark McGowan described the outcome as a "monumental victory". He claimed that Palmer's push for $30 billion in damages would have left the state bankrupt.

Palmer might've thought he was onto a winner, but looks like he might've backed the wrong horse (the proverbial horse being his own legal case).

The race to get jabbed is still going strong in Victoria with the state recording 1571 new COVID-19 cases over night.

Thirteen Victorians also lost their lives to the virus - marking the deadliest day for the state during the recent Delta outbreak.

Victorian high school student Saela, 17, also shared her story of nearly losing her life to COVID-19.

"I spent a month in hospital and nine days in ICU," she said.

"I thought I was safe, I was young."

She and her family passionately advocated for people to "at least think about" getting a vaccination.

The Northern Territory has placed its bets on mandatory vaccines for essential workers, following in the footsteps of southern states.

Territorians who work with vulnerable people, in customer-facing jobs, are involved in logistics or infrastructure critical to Territory or Aboriginal communities and the community services sector must get their first jab before November 12.

The move is not super surprising given a Territory government spokesman told the AAP last week that the state would miss its 80 per cent vaccine target in its "50-day race to freedom".

However, down in NSW the state has taken a run up the inside of the track and is nearing its 80 per cent vaccine milestone faster than expected.

NSW could reach 80 per cent of those aged 16 years and over having received both jabs by this Sunday - only a week after the state embraced its 'Freedom Day'.

NSW Premier Dominic Perrottet has flagged even more new freedoms for the state next week.

Further south, a New South Wales man, who tested positive for COVID-19, breached hotel quarantine in Tasmania after flying to the state without legal clearances.

The man was fined $3000 for his troubles.

While the race against COVID is far from over, it somewhat feels like Australia is at least on the right track.

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